Paul Englishby (An Education, Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, Luther, The Musketeers) is currently scoring the upcoming Acorn TV original series Queens of Mystery. The show is created by Julian Unthank (Doc Martin, New Tricks) and stars Matilda Stone, Olivia Vinall, Julie Graham, Sarah Woodwar, Siobhan Redmond, Andrew Leung, Rebecca Grant, Michael Elcock and Martin Trenaman. The British drama centers on three crime-writing sisters, and their 28-year old niece who use their extensive knowledge of crime to solve whodunit style murders in the picturesque English village of Wildemarsh. Queens of Mystery will premiere later this year on Acorn TV.

  1. Craig Dayton says:

    I am confused by the composer as he/she relates to “Queens of Mystery”.

    First, I don’t understand why it seems that UK production companies seem to have so little respect for the composer nowadays. Of course, Acorn.TV continues to do things that infuriate the viewer in many ways, but other than that, why don’t English production companies give the composer the same single-card display at the beginning of the production, as they do for, let’s say, the director?

    That USED to be the standard, but, like I say, it seems to be the standard operating procedure for the UK filmmakers nowadays to show no regards for the composer at all.

    With “Queens of Mystery,” I can’t find the composer listed even in the end credits. Paul Englishby is certainly not there (unless he is bunched in with the rest of the blurry end credits…try using a bigger font, Acorn). The only thing that I see that comes close is a “score preparation by”. What, exactly, is that?!

    If nothing else, take a lesson from “Agatha Christie’s Poirot” and see how they properly give credit on a single screen to Christopher Gunning in, at least, the end credits.

    Clearly this topic has been a thorn in my side for a very long time with the English production companies and even minor filmmakers in England. I’m just confused as to what point and why did the British lose their understanding as to how important the music (and the composer) is to their productions. Clearly, they don’t give a rip.

    Don’t believe me…take out the music and see how well the film (or TV show) holds up.

    • Craig Dayton says:

      Correction: I do now see where Paul Englishby is, indeed, the composer of this series. There is a double roll of the end credits, where he appears near the end. He is brilliant, and does an amazing job on this series. However, I have not changed my view on the UK filmmakers. Paul Englishby should be listed at the beginning of the episodes, but I will never convince the British filmmaker to respect the composer.